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Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K. 551, "Jupiter"

Thunder and lightning alongside the smiling, radiant face of a father: it’s Jupiter, the father of all gods! And what better nickname than “Jupiter” for Mozart’s Symphony No. 41? Strauss himself proclaimed: “Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Jupiter Symphony is the most beautiful work I have ever heard!” Composed in the summer of 1788 alongside Symphonies No. 39 and 40 (a period of financial decline), Symphony No. 41 in C Major would be the last symphonic work of the German composer. The C Major key signature contributes to the idea of light and splendour that emanates from the score, an idea introduced from the beginning by the Allegro vivace. In this first movement, forays into opera buffa melodies produce a novel fusion of facetiousness and contrupuntal style. Moving swiftly to the Andante cantabile, then the Minuetto of the third movement, the entrance of the percussion heralds the magnificence of the last movement. The Finale is then built around a coda-fugue, which has also earned it the name “Symphony with a Final Fuge.” The Symphony ends with a reversible five-part counterpoint and sublime orchestral virtuosity. 

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Stream Mozart’s Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K. 551, "Jupiter" on medici.tv!

medici.tv is the best online platform for streaming Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony No. 41 live, on replay or VOD, offering you a virtual ticket to the most exciting concerts with the world’s best artists and orchestras captured in HD video. Symphony No. 41 in C Major is the last symphony of one of the greatest geniuses in all of humanity’s history: Mozart. It is imbued with great serenity and a formidable expressive power. The date on which Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony No. 41 first premiered is a mystery. The piece was completed in 1788, but it didn’t appear on the program of any concerts until 1819… It’s possible that Mozart may have died without ever hearing this masterpiece performed! medici.tv offers you the best performances of this artistic and symphonic pinnacle, under the baton of incredible conductors including Daniel Barenboim, Sir Simon Rattle, among others. What are you waiting for? Discover the “Jupiter” Symphony No. 41 today!

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The greatest artists of our time perform Mozart’s Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K. 551, "Jupiter" on medici.tv, your #1 classical streaming platform 

In his film Manhattan, Woody Allen mentions the second movement of Mozart’s Symphony No. 41 in his list of “things worth living for.” In fact, the “Jupiter” Symphony No. 41 is unanimously recognized as a pillar of the symphonic repertoire. Its grandeur, orchestral virtuosity, power and imposing polyphonic construction of the fugue in the last movement have guaranteed it a place of honor in all the finest concert halls in the world. It is not accidentally that the composer J.P. Salamon named Symphony No. 41 after the father of all gods: Jupiter! From London to Geneva, join the best classical music ensembles to hear Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter!”