Opera

Grétry's Richard Cœur de Lion (Richard the Lionheart)

Marshall Pynkoski (stage direction), Hervé Niquet (conductor) — With Rémy Mathieu (Blondel), Reinoud Van Mechelen (Richard), Melody Louledjian (Laurette), Marie Perbost (Antonio) ...

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Cast

Marshall Pynkoski — Stage director

Jeannette Lajeunesse Zingg — Choreographer

Antoine Fontaine — Set designer

Camille Assaf — Costumes

Hervé Gary — Lighting

Rémy Mathieu — Blondel

Reinoud Van Mechelen — Richard

Melody Louledjian — Laurette

Marie Perbost — Antonio, The Countess

Geoffroy Buffière — Sir Williams

Jean-Gabriel Saint Martin — Urbain, Florestan, Mathurin

François Pardailhé — Guillot, Charles

Cécile Achille — Madame Mathurin

Charles Barbier — The seneschal

Agathe Boudet — Colette

Virginie Lefebvre — Beatrix

François Joron — A peasant

Program notes

For the first time since the beginning of the French Revolution, André Grétry's Richard Cœur de Lion (Richard the Lionheart) returns to the Palace of Versailles in 2019—230 years after its last Royal Opera performance! Rediscover a comic opera masterpiece, brought to you by an eminently qualified team: the renowned Canadian duo of Baroque specialists Marshall Pynkoski (stage director) and Jeannette Lajeunesse Zingg (choreographer); Baroque ensemble par excellence Le Concert Spirituel, under the baton of their director Hervé Niquet; acclaimed vocalists like Rémy Mathieu as Blondel and Reinoud Van Mechelen as King Richard; and the exquisite ballet dancers of the Royal Opera of Versailles.

One of the most popular operas of its day—and the best-known 18th-century opéra comique for a century after its premiere—Richard Cœur de Lion recounts the captivity of King Richard the Lionheart in Austria on his way home from the Crusades, and his rescue by faithful squire Blondel de Nesle. This rich and stunning production transposes the medieval action upon Revolutionary era accoutrements, recreating the fashion and decor familiar to the Versailles audiences who last appreciated this masterwork in 1789.

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